The Writer’s Life According To Jack Sparrow

Captain Jack says it best.

You Write Fiction

Yo-ho, yo-ho, a writer’s life for me…I think. Here are 11 gifs that sum up a writer’s life quite nicely.

sparrow4 When a new idea hits you.

sparrow6 When your cat mocks your new idea.

sparrow3 Writer’s block.

sparrow10 This chapter needs some work…

sparrow9 The cat’s on the keyboard again.

sparrow11 The first time someone asks about your book.

sparrow 2 When a friend/relative singles you out as a writer.

sparrow8 When you’re forced to socialize.

sparrow5 The one time you have company over.

sparrow7 When someone criticizes your writing.

sparrow2 When you get a good review on your book.

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Guest Nicholas Rossis: You’re a SUCCESS!

This is a great article. Thanks Nicholas and Rachael.

Fiction by Rachael Ritchey

I’m so excited one of my favorite authors has agreed to be a guest on my blog.  Today I’d like to welcome Nicholas Rossis to our little corner of the wide web of the world.

nicholas-rossisNicholas is from Athens, Greece (this alone is “‘nough said” 🙂 ). He’s an author, web designer, and author services specialist. To find out more about him, visit his About Nicholas Rossis page on his newly redesigned website. I’m particularly smiling about the part with his dad. It always make me smile. 🙂

So, I’ll stop yammering and let you enjoy this good reminder for us all.


From Guest Author: Nicholas Rossis

You’re a Success!

When Rachael asked me for a guest post, she did so in such a kind and charming way that she made me feel like I’m some big successful author. Which is funny, because I don’t feel particularly successful as an author—not…

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When Words Won’t Come — Lit World Interviews

We’ve all shared tips on how to write every day and how to fight that devil, procrastination. Or in other words, how to nip our laziness in the bud. Laziness is indeed a real thing, but often when we think that that’s exactly what our problem is, it isn’t. It’s overwhelm. Beating ourselves up with […]

via When Words Won’t Come — Lit World Interviews

Deborah Ratliff: The Lonely Writer

Writers Unite!

Writing is lonely work. At least, that is the opinion of friends of mine who are not writers. They ask, how can you sit at a computer all day and not talk to anyone? Somehow, telling them, I’m never alone, that I talk to my characters would likely not reassure them being alone is good for me.

The fact is that despite the witty or testy or romantic conversation we have with our creations, writing is lonely work.

My career provided a writing outlet. I wrote research papers, training, operations, and policy manuals, newsletters, print and broadcast advertising copy.  While necessary within the scope of my work, and writing advertising was certainly challenging, I never felt fulfilled. When time to write presented itself after a corporate downsizing resulting in a layoff, I took the plunge. I started writing fiction.

As an only child, the solitude of writing was never a…

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Why Do You Write? (The Madness Behind Being a Writer)

A writer & her adolescent muse

insane

Why do writers write?

The answer seems obvious, and the reasons are similar among most writers.

It’s because we must.

It’s who we are.

We have no choice but to write…

or go stark, raving mad.

There has to be more to it than that.

In my mind, at least.

We must dig deeper.

There is a reason other than the ones we give to people (even to ourselves).

What is it?

Be honest.

Why write at all?  What’s the true driving force behind this passion? This innate desire to put words down? To create?

There has to be more than just “I need to write.”

Is it because we are already mad?

Insane?

Mentally ill?

Perhaps we need to be crazy enough to dig deep into our mind, the deepest, darkest parts of our psyche in order to pull out our masterpieces.

To share openly with…

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Lost Inside My Head

brain slugWhy do I get my best writing ideas at the most inopportune moments?  Someone should invent a device that transcribes writer’s ideas into meaningful notes so we don’t lose the great ideas we come up with.  I guess this is why I carry a notebook and pen around with me everywhere I go. But it’s not the ideas I get when I’m ready for them that I’m talking about.  It’s the ones I get when I’m driving or in the shower that I can’t write down–those are the ideas that seem to get lost inside my head somehow.  It’s not until weeks later when the lightbulb comes on, the idea comes back to me, and I find myself saying, “Oh yeah.  That’s what I was going to do with that scene.”