Overcome Your Writer’s Block: Key Strategies On Pushing Past Your Mental Brick Wall

Writers block can be detrimental to a writer. Here are some tips to help overcome your block.

Kobo Writing Life

Writing can be a difficult and trying task even for the most seasoned of writers. At some point or another it’s inevitable that you’ll “hit the wall” and suffer from the dreaded curse of writer’s block. However, there’s no reason that your bout with writer’s block should spell disaster because there are some strategies that can help you push past that wall and allow those creative juices to start flowing freely again. Here’s some things to help get you started.

1) Don’t Stress It

The first strategy is not to let writers block stress you out. Yes, your deadline may be quickly approaching, but stressing and panicking about it certainly won’t help. In fact, if you let the stress consume you then you’ll find it even harder to push past this wall and get back to writing. Stress only serves to make the mental brick wall even harder to break…

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When Words Won’t Come — Lit World Interviews

We’ve all shared tips on how to write every day and how to fight that devil, procrastination. Or in other words, how to nip our laziness in the bud. Laziness is indeed a real thing, but often when we think that that’s exactly what our problem is, it isn’t. It’s overwhelm. Beating ourselves up with […]

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Lost Inside My Head

brain slugWhy do I get my best writing ideas at the most inopportune moments?  Someone should invent a device that transcribes writer’s ideas into meaningful notes so we don’t lose the great ideas we come up with.  I guess this is why I carry a notebook and pen around with me everywhere I go. But it’s not the ideas I get when I’m ready for them that I’m talking about.  It’s the ones I get when I’m driving or in the shower that I can’t write down–those are the ideas that seem to get lost inside my head somehow.  It’s not until weeks later when the lightbulb comes on, the idea comes back to me, and I find myself saying, “Oh yeah.  That’s what I was going to do with that scene.”