What I Learned Writing My First Book

As writers, all of us have made mistakes along the way, but we’ve learned from mistakes and have become better writers because of them. Here’s a great article on some of the many things writers learn from writing their first novel.

Michael James

Writing a novel is hard.  That’s what I learned.  The end.

Thanks for reading, everyone!

Okay I may have figured out a few other things.  It’s a laborious and thankless job with a remote chance of payoff in the end.  Still, it’s better than the alternative, which is not writing a book.

In Feb, 2017, I completed the final sentence of the first draft of my book. It clocks in at about 80,000 words and took about 7 months to write. It was my first attempt at writing a novel, and I’m pretty proud of myself for finishing.

1. I LEARNED HOW TO BE FINE WITH BEING TERRIBLE.

I put this first because it was the hardest lesson to learn and slowed me down the most. The first draft does not need to be perfect. For my first two months of writing, I was unable to move past a chapter…

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19 Self-editing Tips

If you’re in that editing stage and looking for some tips, this is helpful.

Help! Help!

Now that I’ve published my first novel, To Hunt a Sub, I can say from experience that writing it and editing it took equally long periods of time (and marketing is just as involved). After finishing the final rough draft (yeah, sure) and before emailing it to an editor, I wanted it as clean possible. I searched through a wide collection of self-editing books like these:

The Novel Writer’s Toolkit by Bob Mayer

Self-editing for Fiction Writers by Renni Browne

The Marshall Plan for Novel Writing by Evan Marshall

…and came up with a list of fixes that I felt would not only clean up grammar and editing, but the voice and pacing that seemed to bog my story down. Here are ideas you might like:

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